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About Tanzania

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Tanzania neighbors Kenya to the South and West and was formed by the union of the United Republic of Tanganyika and Zanzibar. Geographically, it is a vast central plateau, surrounded by the three great lakes – Lake Victoria, Lake Tanganyika and Lake Malawi, slopping down towards the Indian Ocean where-in sit the islands of Unguja, Pemba and Mafia which make up the Zanzibar archipelago. The country is intersected by the Great Rift Valley, the earth’s largest fault, and dotted with volcanoes including Africa’s tallest and the world’s largest standing mountain, Mount Kilimanjaro.

Inhabited by about one hundred and twenty ethnic groups including the Maasai, Tanzania offers a great mixture of culture and safari. It is 'Big Game' country where close to a quarter of the country’s total land is reserved for wildlife conservation. A combination of Kenya and Tanzania is by far the best safari one can have in Africa. Serengeti National Park which is adjoined to Kenya’s Masai Mara National Reserve is a stage Great Migration of Wildebeests and Zebras. Ngorongoro Crater, Lake Manyara National Park, known for the tree climbing Lions and thousands of Flamingos are some of the most popular safari destinations of Tanzania.

Zanzibar is a major tourist resort characterized by beautiful sandy beaches with fringing coral reefs, and the magic of historic Stone Town - said to be one of the few functioning ancient towns in East Africa. Stone Town was recently and deservedly declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

The country is divided into 26 regions, 5 on the semi-autonomous islands of Zanzibar, and 21 on the mainland in the former Tanganyika. The East African nation of Tanzania dates formally from 1964, when it was formed out of the union of the much larger mainland territory of Tanganyika and the coastal archipelago of Zanzibar. The former was a colony and part of German East Africa from the 1880s to 1919, when, under the League of Nations, it became a British mandate until independence in 1961. It served as a military outpost during World War II, providing financial help, munitions, and soldiers.

Zanzibar was settled as a trading hub, subsequently controlled by the Portuguese, the Sultanate of Oman, and then as a British protectorate by the end of the nineteenth century.

Tanzania is a developing East African nation noted for both its history of stability and its astounding natural beauty. A robust tourist industry provides all levels of tourist amenities, although higher-end facilities are concentrated mainly in the cities and selected game parks.
Zanzibar, although part of the union government, has its own government and exercises considerable autonomy.

Geography
A large central plateau makes up most of the mainland, at between 900 m and 1800 m. The mountain ranges of the Eastern Arc and the Southern and Northern Highlands cut across the country to form part of the Great Rift Valley.


A land of geographical extremes, Tanzania houses the highest peak (Mount Kilimanjaro), the lowest point (the lake bed of Lake Tanganyika), and a portion of the Africa’s largest lake, Lake Victoria - shared with Uganda and Kenya .

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